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. there are ways to make the elected officials accountable here and now. then we're talking about redistricting commissions, which i think should be independent. open primaries i think are crucial. we should have biannul budgets. the idea of no budget no pay. the list goes on. i can name some others too. >> before we go on to the rest of the panelists i already messed up my duties. we're going to put on the screen now the first poll question of the afternoon that we're going to put to our television and our online audience. the question is, is the congress envisioned by our founders still able to meet the changing needs of our country? the key word is able to meet the changing needs of our country. i think we get a strong vote no. but we ask for those watching at home to vote and see if congress is able to immediate those -- meet those needs. we're being live streamed on the policy center website. or you can tweet us husing the hashtag engage u.s.a. later in the program i will read your twitter comments. first i want to get back to our panel. i want to go to senator daschle. senator snow laid o
? resolution -- it only needs 51 votes. as of this morning, there were four power up or be election in 2014 in that mr. romney one in 2014. -- wion in 2014. they have not yet said whether or not they would vote for that budget. it might be a nailbiter. >> the house passed its budget blueprint. what is the next that in both chambers? >> each chamber will pass a budget. harry reid was added as conference. there'll be effort to try to reach a budget resolution. said something like, what is a point of trying? we are so far apart. the two proposals are vastly different. , in theif anything absence of a presidential budget on capitol hill that the senate democrats and house republicans will use this opportunity to lay out their long-term vision for what the budget should look la ike. hunter with bloomberg news. thank you for the insight. you can watch the senate under way right now in session on our companion network, c-span 2. >> monday night on "first dies ofrachel jackson an apparent heart attack before andrew jackson takes office. his niece comes the white house hostess, but is later dismisse
media to make your elected officials accountable. there is no reason they ought to be taking recesses when they are facing a sequester frankly. the debt ceiling back in 2011. half our time in the senate between january and june, half of our time was not spent on legislative business. in fact in 2011 alone, it was one of the fewest number of days we've been in session since 1992 and here it was coinciding with one of the event that created the highest level of policy uncertainty of any event over the last 20 years, surpassing the wars, surpassing the financial crieses, september 11th. just to name some major events. and that debt ceiling debacle did more to disrupt the public's confidence in the integrity of the political process in washington. so you have to make your elected officials accountable. have you social immediate yafment you can build an online community snainsly and you get a message multiplire. by doing that you can find out where your law makers are. are they in session five days a week? they should be working. these are things you can be doing now. these are simple solu
bigamist during her husband's election, rachel jackson dies of a heart attack. his knees becomes the what -- the white house hostess. during the next administration, mrs. van buren is the hostess for her father-in-law who is a widower. we will include your questions by phone, facebook, and twitter. life at 9 p.m. >> now, former republican discusses the future of the political parties. participants included haley barbour. it was held at the museum in washington dc and was moderated by kelly o'donnell. this is about 45 minutes. >> good morning. we are so glad to have you with us with this set of panelists who have not been on the sidelines. what i like about this is we're with people who have been in the room when decisions are made, they have been on the forefront when the sunshine of politics and the heat of politics has been bearing down on them. they know what it is like and can give us a road map of where things might be headed. we will have some fun, and because my day job lets me ask lots of questions, i want to make sure i ask the audience to think about things they want to hear fro
soul searching, particularly if you have an election like 2012 where there were a lot of things that made you feel like republicans could have won. not very popular. you have a very weak economy. it was interesting that in the obama recovery, family income went down to $2,500 a year, where during the recession, income went down $1,500 a year. families were doing worse, yet extremely good campaign, and he won despite his disadvantages and he won frankly in a predictable way. he made the election about his opponent. the romney people allowed obama to define romney. this was rather than romney defining romney, and that is why it is important for republicans we do wrong? the idea that the republican party is in some terrible shape -- certainly i do not buy that. not buy that? >> i do not. i have been around since 1968. i have seen terrible shape. i remember watergate, i remember when the 13% of americans republicans, and the national if we should change the name of the party. whispereds not been now. >> for 40 years, the most number of republicans in the house was 192. today we have
, bring about democratic elections, that is not our job. we're good at building roads, crushing opposing armies. no government is good at the work of nation building, including ours. then there is the obama wave. find and concord. i do not want america to be in the business of turning every land into combat for democracy -- not democracy. >> they decide they will go to kill some americans. what difference does it make? >> is she there? you, and thank you for being nice to paul. i want to answer this. of course we are the world's policeman. it has been left to us. the extent we are unwilling prevent our people kids from going to school, we are the world's bullies. what we are not is the world's social worker. the false obligation to bring universal sovereign two countries, to make sure people can listen to madonna, these are worthy goals. we are good at the big tasks. building roads, opposing armies. no one is as good at nation building, including ours. >> next question, and, tucker, you will go first. federal debt does not matter. we can stimulate our way to prosperity. >> you are insane
. >> my question is around security and the impacts it have on future elections. we talked about that delta being a contested territory. considering the violence that we saw there and in the region in general, but kind of impact could that have swaying the different candidates and parties in the future and may be the overall impact of security in general on the country and changing voter patterns? >> ok. >> after the courts gave time to postpone the elections, has there been any reflection by morsi or the brotherhood on how to approach elections and what changes do you foresee? >> ok. andn, brotherhood questions internal thinking of the situation. yes, sir. >> very quickly, we are coming to a very serious economic cliff. what do you think the u.s. should be doing with regards to the imf agreement? is the u.s. pushing the imf do have one or not to have one? should the imf just give the money to egypt? what needs to be done? >> last one and then closing comments. ini'm working with a program cairo. i'm here for a visit. my question stems a little bit of everything people have been
. to my complete shock, she said yes. after the election, of course, where reagan got elected president, and we went to their church, and my two daughters and my wife were all baptized. we got back to washington. we joined a church. and it has been our life ever since. >> back to your early career, as a writer, reporter, what was your first reporting job? how long did you just report not giving a penny? >> for a long time. i mean, i was a reporter for 20 years before "the new republic" magazine then starting "the weekly standard." my first job out of college, of course, i did not have a job. i wrote a bunch of newspapers in the south. i just, i did not want to go to the north. i kind of liked the south. you know, i read "all the king's men." it was an appealing book to me. it was a great interest to me. anyway, i wrote a bunch of newspapers. one of them in charleston, south carolina, "news and courier" offered me train fare to come down and back and i leaped at it. they offered me a job at $80 a week. it was in 1965. i moved to charleston, south carolina. not a great news town as it tur
. the next elections next year are going to show, hopefully, the more mature response from the electorate. having said that, i quickly add the qualification of this will be, again, colored and tempered by the fears of being whipped up right now. among the islamist shia, there is a weapon they use, the sunnis are coming to get you. and that is now amplified by the sunnis arabs are coming to get you. that makes the fear even more potent. the best things that the sunni arabs in iraq should do is try to alleviate this year. most of the wider element is aware of the danger of this fear, of government out of control. coming back to muqtada, the next elections, if they are not colored by a fervor, might produce a more mature out, and provide a new crop of younger leaders who have been less contaminated by the events of recent years. there is a ray of hope there. >> if i could just add to that, i agree entirely with the ambassador's assessment of muqtada al-sadr. he himself does not know what he is doing the day after tomorrow. sadly, assassination can be effective and the assassination of his fa
him. not an elected official, but a bureaucrat doing this. this is the problem and the concern i have for the future of the usa and i do not own a gun. thank you. g: i mean, that is a valid point. it is important to point out that all of the measures under consideration, the assault weapons ban, the prohibition on high-capacity ammunition magazines, they would not be retroactive. the government would not take away guns that someone currently owns. they were just ban you from being able to purchase the gun in the future. that is why we have seen so many long lines at the gun store, where people are buying weapons they fear might be banned in the future, but the government would not take them away if you already own them. host: we saw a piece recently in "bloomberg businessweek" looking at the power of the nra and the debates over guns. they go over some items for gun control opponents to remember him calling them "hard realities. why is that not translating into votes in congress? guest: it is partly because the gun rights groups, the nra, manufacturers, sporting associations, have bee
the incumbent governor, republican, had defeated in the primarily then won the election in 2006 which was not a good republican year, but alaska is a pretty republican state and she won. so there she was in 2007. so i came back. i interviewed a bunch of people by phone and talked to her twice. i interviewed her twice on the phone and wrote a piece for "the weekly standard" about sarah palin. it was the first piece written about her in the national magazine in the united states. i don't go around bragging that i discovered her. >> the reason i ask you about this is here's "the weekly standard" magazine. this is a recent issue. most weeks, how many pages? 36 or so. >> 36 or 40. >> when did you know that column might have had an impact, led eventually to john mccain choosing her as vice president? >> when i knew when her name had started popping up. >> did you find out directly? what person saw that and reacted that strongly to it? >> well, it was one person who saw it and reacted strongly was bill kristol. he started talking her up. this was back in the summer of 2008 when john mccain o
a technocratic government. we want elections. they're not being supported. so long as they focus on the plo, the reconciliation is going nowhere. on the israeli side, i'm worried about the decision making loop. you're losing a few people who are known for restraint on this issue, the defense minister, two agents part of the octet. they are gone. now you have a more dovish agent on iran, more hawkish on the palestinian issue, though he is not ideological. if you could convince him that there will be palestinian reciprocity, and they say things like to go states for two people, you'll see that he and his team will also adjust, but without reciprocity, they are not going to. you also have the head of the housing ministry, he used -- we used to have an orthodox person, or the ultraorthodox issue was the main issue. the head of the finance committee of the knesset -- it is a different consolation there that could make this more of an issue. this idea of a freeze beyond the barrier -- there are some people interested -- on the palestinian side, we will not justify the barrier. the college on the
to the president, which a lot of the politicians have not really been doing that much now that the election is over, and so, he got a better reception than maybe anybody else, just in terms of an exciting everyone, and so it was notable that in the straw poll he did as well as he did. host: also, sarah palin, the previous nominee, a headline this morning, sarah palin brings down the house at the conference, and she is pictured in newspapers around the country gulp.he big what was that the >> it was a great prop. they were criticizing michael bloomberg, going after the many mentality, as she sees it, and she has had a much lower profile since the election. she is not on television. she no longer has a television contract. but the crowd still loved her. she had a lot of very funny jokes for this audience. among thelly not seen conservative activists as a politician so much anymore as sort of a thought leader in the movement or an entertainer is not the right word, but moving in that direction. host: and this is the headlines from "new york daily news." here is more with the former vice-presidential n
up to the 2014 primary elections. about 15 minutes. >>>> two years ago the president told a lie about the supreme court decision called citizens united. the case struck a huge blow. the president of citizens united is up next. he has proposed document series since 2004. please welcome david bossie. [applause] i'm president of citizens united. it has been a big year, as we celebrate our 25th anniversary. it is great to be back here as we come together for our 40th time. citizens united is doing it again this year, where we get a chance to show off some of the groundbreaking conservative films available today. conservatives need to think of new and innovative ways to develop and deliver our message to a broad our audience. one of those ways is through film. fellow conservatives, i am going. fall, but the conservative movement is as strong as ever. more voices are being heard here in this hall and across the nation because we are fighting for our rights and the traditional american values we all share. we believe in american exceptionalism, not obama's socialist agenda. unfortunately, so
. -- disease dizzily in washington is people care more about the next election than the future of the country. if we get to a grand bargaining, you would have some people quit worrying about whether or not to get reelected and fix the country. if we do not, it will be about people protecting their interests and their political position. the country will suffer. >> on that point, the house this week past by most measures what would be considered a highly political document -- their budget. it is a political document. >> this is highly political. lex i am not disagreeing. neither of these have a chance of becoming law. at are you a your colleagues not more time finding a middle ground instead of going through show but? -- showboat's? >> they want to get paid. that is number one. where finally a budget you can offer amendments and highlight things that need to be changed in the federal government is an important exercise. , 76example, last night senators voted to eliminate the medical device tax. if you put that in the budget, if it is allowed to come up, it will go through the senate and throug
the election, she died of an apparent heart attack before he took office. -- effect the extent of her death on his presidency. and the scandal that led to her dismissal. in the second part, the emergence of dolly madison and washington politics. in jellico singleton introducing her to her future husband, martin van buren. first ladies, influence and image, live, next monday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span and c- span three. also on c-span radio and c- span.org. our website has more about the first ladies, including a special section, welcome to the white house. that chronicles life in the executive mansion during the tenure of the first ladies. edition of the book "first ladies of the united states of america." and thoughts from michelle obama on the role of first lady throughout history. now available for the discounted plus shipping. c-span.org/products. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. next here on c-span, republican national committee chairman) this talk about the future of the -- reince priebus talks
to get to is the political dynamics in terms of how it affects elections. and the biggest disease in washington in my opinion, is people care more about the next election than they do the future of the country. so if we get to a grand bargain ul have some people come off and quit worrying about whether or not they want to get reelected and try to fix the country and if we don't it will be about people protecting their political positions and the country will suffer markedly from it. >> on that point, the house this week passed what by most measures would be considered a highly political document, their budget. the senate is getting ready to pass its own budget which is another political document. neither -- >> it is just as highly political. >> i am not disagreeing. neither has a chance of becoming law. so i wonder why you and your colleagues aren't spending more time trying to find middle ground instead of going through what are effectively show votes. >> they want to get paid. and if they don't pass the budget they won't get paid. that's number one. number two, is having finally
newspaper this morning -- a story by gina smith for the island. turnout will decide today's election for the first congressional seat in south carolina. gina smith is joining us on the phone this morning. gina smith, tell me about this race. who is running and why? guest: good morning. this is like christmas morning for me. i'm so excited. this is really an exciting race, because 18 republicans, two democrats, an incredibly crowded field but some of the names in this race just make it delicious to watch. we have mark sham ford, the former governor who most of the nation remembers as the guy who slipped out of the country in 2009 so he could visit his mistress, and he -- everyone thought he was hiking the appalachian trail but he was up with a female. so governor sanford is back on his redemption tour, we also family member 's and steven colbert, the comedian, his sister. and a lot of mudslinging which outh carolina is infamous for. host: so sanford is is leading for the primary? guest: yes. it was a comeback story that you thought if it happened it would be five or eight years from n
should have soul searching, particularly if you have an election like 2012 where there were a lot of things that made you feel like republicans could have won. you have the president who was not very popular. you have very high unemployment. you have a very weak economy. it was interesting that in the obama recovery, family income went down to $2,500 a year, where during the recession, income went down $1,500 a year. families were doing worse, yet in the campaign, obama ran an extremely good campaign, and he won despite his disadvantages and he won frankly in a predictable way. he made the election about his opponent. the romney people allowed obama to define romney. this was rather than romney defining romney, and that is why it is important for republicans to look back and say, what did we do wrong? the idea that the republican party is in some terrible shape -- >> you do not buy that? >> certainly i do not buy that. i have seen terrible shape. i remember watergate, i remember when the 13% of americans identified themselves as republicans, and the national chairman appointed peo
in the world. we can rightly be proud of having elected a black president and see it as a historical achievement of our people in our struggle for freedom, justice and equity, the struggle continues. we cannot see it as an end in itself. nor can we be confused and think ,hat the election of one man the election of the man with the need for a rebuilding of a movement. -- for profound and radical change of society. and for bringing good in the world. we must reaffirm our role as a moral and social vanguard in this country. as martin luther king, malcolm x, harry a tuchman, frederick douglass and so many others have taught us, we must avoid the silence in the face of evil and injustice. a silence that would become a betrayer. a betrayer of the best of our ethical social justice [indiscernible] into betrayer of the struggling people of the world. including our own. what is our position on the congo? what about the invasion of africa and libya? what about haiti and its oppression? we must speak truth to power if we really believe in our tradition. if we have a commitment to our own faith.
freedom, social justice in the world. although we can rightly be proud of having elected a black president and see it as a historical achievement of our people in our struggle for freedom, justice and equity, the struggle continues. we cannot see it as an end in itself. nor can we be confused and think that the election of one man, the election of the man with the need for a rebuilding of a movement for profound and radical change of society. and for bringing good in the world. m
and this election recycle. --did they do a lot to bid bridge the gaps. , we sawuld be persuaded the israeli public they even though it may started with mistrust towards obama, it ended this week with a lot of affection. --really did manage to build bridge some of these gaps. he arrived in israel on wednesday. he met with the prime minister and president perez. he traveled to the west bank and he met with the palestinian authority. on friday, meeting with the president of jordan before playing tourist yesterday and he asked to washington about iran's ambitions. here is more from the trip and the comments of the israeli prime has -- president. we discussed the long-range issues for both of our countries. among these is iran's relentless pursuit of nuclear weapons. , you have made it clear that you are determined to preventing iran from developing nuclear weapons. i appreciate your forthright position on this. i appreciate that you have noted that you have acted to orchestrate through determined diplomacy and strong sanctions that are getting stronger yet. and your great success in mobilizing interna
. coming up next, michael steele former chairman of the rnc party. he will weigh in on the 2012 election and ralph nader, a consumer, advocate, and past president of canada will look at the disparity between ceo pay and minimum-wage. we will be right back. >> going straight to a personal poppet. 11 on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since late 2009. his term is up. yours will be of next year. should we expect to see turnover at the commission? >> we do not have staggered terms. the past six years has flown by very quickly. and we shall see. i get asked this question every couple of years. we of been there almost seven years. inflection points like this. we shall see. shall see what? >> about what to do next. i did not think we should stay in these positions for ever, but at the same time, i love my job. that is part of what is keeping me here. we of a lot of a born work to do. of important work to do. we spoke with the commissioners before his announcement. hear more tonight on "the communicators." tonight on first ladies, called a bigamist and adults were during her
obamacare, which was the central issue the last campaign where you remember president obama was re-elected, the senate went even more democratic, and the house democrats gained seats and won over a million more votes than the republicans. normal people would think that the obamacare issue might be settled. does anybody realistically think it's going away any time soon? the republican fantasy budget reduces taxes dramatically without a hint of how it would be possible. without exploding the deficit or dramatically raising taxes on the middle class. this is consistent with what the romney ryan ticket said on the campaign trail last fall. the same issue where they dodged, assembled, and ignored the perfectly reasonable question how is it possible? six months later it's back in the budget but there's still -- but there still is no answer. during the last 40 years there have been only four budgets without deficits. the last three clinton budgets and the one that george bush inherited from bill clinton. in each case taxes as a percentage of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fan
to act, but he is a factor and he will continue to be a factor. the next elections next year are going to show, hopefully, the more mature response from the electorate. addng said that, i quickly the qualification of this will be, again, colored and tempered by the fears of being whipped up right now. , therehe islamist shia is a weapon they use, the sun nis are coming to get you. and that is now amplified by the sunnis arabs are coming to get you. that makes the fear even more potent. things that the sunni arabs in iraq should do is try to alleviate this year. ist of the wider element aware of the danger of this yeafear, of government out of control. muqtada,ack to my d the next elections, if they are not colored by a fervor, might produce a more mature out, and provide a new crop of younger leaders who have been less contaminated by the events of recent years. there is a ray of hope there. >> if i could just add to that, theree entirely with ambassador's assessment of muqtada al-sadr. he himself does not know what he the day after tomorrow. sadly, assassination can be very effective
a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the able, richard norton smith and meet amanda matthews. she is at the massachusetts historical society where she is a research associate for the adams papers. ms. matthews, we learned there was not much documentary evidence about elizabeth monroe. how about louisa catherine adams, what exists? >> quite a wealth. she kept diaries intermittently. she wrote autobiographies and memoirs. there are hundreds and hundreds of letters of hers. we have her thoughts and feelings from her point of view, both reflective and contemporary as the events were taking place. >> another suggested tha
to acknowledge it or not, we have divided government. the american people elected a republican majority in the house, and our job is to make the case for our policies, find common ground where it exists and see if we can make this divided government work, and that is what we intend to do. we owe the american people a responsible balanced budget. that's what we are delivering today, and i urge support of this resolution. the chair: the time of the gentleman has expired. all time for debate has expired. under the rule the committee rises. the speaker pro tempore: mr. chairman. the chair: mr. speaker, the committee of the whole house on the state of the union having had under consideration house concurrent resolution 25 and pursuant to house resolution 1 2 i report the -- 1 2 i report the con-- 122 i report the concurrent resolution back to the house. the speaker pro tempore: the chairman of the committee of the whole house on the state of the union reports that it has had under consideration house resolution 25 and pursuant to house resolution 122 reports the concurrent resolution back t
to be a factor. the next elections next year are going to show, hopefully, the more mature response from the electorate. having said that, i quickly add the qualification of this will be, again, colored and tempered by the fears of being whipped up right now. among the islamist shia, there is a weapon they use, the are coming to get you. and that is now amplified by the sunnis arabs are coming to get you. that makes the fear even more potent. the best things that the sunni arabs in iraq should do is try to alleviate this year. most of the wider element is aware of the danger of this fear, of government out of control. coming back to muqtada, the next elections, if they are not colored by a fervor, might produce a more mature out, and provide a new crop of younger leaders who have been less contaminated by the events of recent years. there is a ray of hope there. >> if i could just add to that, i agree entirely with the ambassador's assessment of muqtada al-sadr. he himself does not know what is doing the day after tomorrow. sadly, assassination can be very effective and the assassination
: i certainly knew about it. we had not seen anyone look at it in the 2012 election cycle. decided toe and i take a snapshot. it is something i have heard about. it has come up from time to time. in fact, it used to be back before they changed ethics rules about a decade ago in congress, there were relatives .n official payrolls so that has changed some. here are some other members of that "usa today" mentions. the democrat of virginia congressman paid his daughter when hundred $5,000 -- thousands of dollars in bonuses. that amount -- guest: much smaller in terms of doug's payment. a spokeswoman said he was looking for someone else to do the job. $33,000.d about the practice is not limited to veteran lawmakers. the idaho republican congressman who was elected in 2010 put his wife on the payroll. a few months after he got sworn in, may 2011, she earned about $41,000 over a two-year. -- timeframe. host: democrat line, welcome. john? manchester, new hampshire, independent line. caller: good morning, thank you for taking my call. , thank you foren reporting the facts. i believe almost ever
to get maryland to vote for john quincy adams the 1820 four election. >> how about the second question, how involved was she in the politics of the time? >> it has always been murky. there is no clear why between social politicking and the process leading to x number of votes being cast. one of the great skills begin with dolly madison, who understood that more could be achieved out of the committee room, off the floor of the house, in a social setting. louisa catherine is politically and attuned figure. i don't think you would find her dictating a platform. john quincy was 100 years ahead of his time. famously, in his first message to congress, -- remember this is a man whose legitimacy had been questioned. and yet, he introduced this breathtaking program that anticipates the new deal by 100 years. saying the federal government should we in the rowboat and business. there should be a national university and washington. he proposed a national astronomical observatory. a white house of the sky. for this, he was ridiculed by the jeffersonian small government crowd. it did nothing to enh
, it will be increasingly difficult for republicans to win another presidential election in the near future. host: you heard chairman reince priebus talking about that $10 million inclusion effort, one of the many recommendations that he's set to give at the national press club this morning. you can actually watch that on one of our sister networks at 8:30. here's the headline from the "usa today" on that effort. republicans to spend $10 illion on inclusion -- host: we'll be talking about that in the first 45 minutes of the "washington journal" today. we're taking calls from just republicans. up first is bob from philadelphia, pennsylvania. bob, thanks for calling in this morning. caller: good morning. how are you, sir? host: good. your thoughts on this new effort? caller: i think that they are still missing a little bit of the point here. i think the biggest problem is uninformed voters. all they hear all day long is just background noise from mainstream media. i was a staunch liberal democrat. i truly was, until i started doing my own research and finding my own facts. even my mom and dad were staunch lib
is perhaps the most important event in the election.paign, the april 5, 2014. we can talk about what role isaf will have in that. they will provide unprecedented and unparalleled security to this election. isaf's numbers draw down, setting the conditions for the enduring presence force, nato is when the college resolute, setting the conditions will the terms of the capabilities and locations of the platform so that force can be ready to go on the first of january 2013, fully integrated with the afghans in terms of the advisory relationship they will have. 2013 is the year to set the conditions for 2014. 2014 will be the year return and eight i -- will be the year where we terminate the isaf mission. >> i would ask those of you who like to speak to bring up some of the other central issues such as our relationship with president carter side. karzai.president this is a two part question building on what you just said. i would like asking a simple down-to-earth basic question, do the afghan party -- to the afghan army and police fight? the strategy is very well constructed and you have had
're >> they are certainly concerned with it. social media was very important for the election. it remains to be seen how it will hit into governing. they have not been able to make it work for them, for governing. but every president in a modern period has wanted to go around the white house press corps. in the eisenhower administration, when they made their press conference transcripts on the record in 1953 and on television in 1955, the press secretary was interested in getting things out directly. in one of his diary entries he said, we will go directly to the people. that has repeated itself from one administration to the next. the white house press corps continues to be important because those are the people on the ground writing about what it is the president is doing about the policies that he is initiating and what is going on within the white house. that information spreads. you can have something like the huffington post that will be pushing up articles that are in the new york times. i would be wary in thinking i could simply go around them as the white house press corps is irrelevant. it rem
if you have an election like 2012 where there were a lot of things that made you feel like republicans could have won. you have the president who was not very popular. you have very high on a plug. you have a very weak economy. it was interesting that in the obama recovery, family income went down to $2,500 a year, where during the recession in come on it went down $5,000 a year. families were doing worse, yet in the campaign, obama ran an extremely good campaign, and he won despite his disadvantages and he won freckly at a predictable way. he made the election about his opponent. allowed obamaple to define romney. romney thether than fighting romney, and that is why it is important for republicans to look back and say what did we do wrong. the idea that the republican party is in some terrible shape certainly -- i do not buy that. i have seen terrible shape. i remember watergate, i remember when the 13% of americans identified themselves as republicans, and the national chairman appointed people to see if we should change the name of the party. for 40 years, the most number of republi
with it. the social media was very important for their election. they have been able to har net that engine that they used in the campaign and make it work for them and governing. when they made their press transscripts available on the record, the press secretary james haggard was very interested in getting things out directly. he said in one of his diary entries, to hell with reporters, we'll go directly to the people. those have to do with what the president is doing inside the white house, and then that information spreads. so you can have smgs like "the huffington post" thinking i could simply go around them in the white house press corps is irrelevant. it remains very relevant. >> the white house issues a photograph of the president in any setting, but it is only a society photo. are news organizations becoming reluctant to use that photo? >> it is really quite the opposite. they have started picking up that image on flicker. what you see is the white house photographer is there to photograph the president, not the presidency, not what's happening in the white house, but s
is that, it depends on you are going obamacare, as you say. the american people spoke in the election that they did not want that repealed, but you continue to do that. i think it is dishonest. i heard you earlier when you stated that you are not even a part of that. you guys did not want to participate in forming that deal. what is sad about it, it is part of something you republicans wanted to do years ago. i feel that you guys, both sides, are fighting the american people. it is unfortunate, because we're the ones that sent you guys there, and you act like you are not working for the people and your job is to work for the people. .uest: i cannot agree more thanks. the president's health care law, and i rarely call it obamacare. the president calls it obamacare, i do not. i call it the president's health care law or the aca. please hear me, this law, the current law will harm, i believe as a physician, will harm the ability of your dr. to take care of you. that does not make any sense to me. it is important, when we believe that is the case, we would be irresponsible if we do not pr
single idea, every single individual from the most junior member just elected two months ago to the most senior member who has been here for 40 years, if you have a budget idea, you get to have it heard on the floor of the house. in this case, mr. speaker, that's going to be six buckets we are going to look at -- budgets we are going to look at tomorrow. six budgets. mr. speaker, i believe having an open process is important. we made in order the progressive caucus budget. that progressive caucus budget trillion.es by $5.7 unashamed, unabashed. tough economy, let's raise taxes by $5.7 trillion. and let's increase spending even more than we are today. i'm glad that that budget's going to be here on the floor. congressional black caucus raises taxes $4. trillion. mr. van hollen's substitute raises taxes $1.2 trillion. and you saw the chart the chairman of the rules committee had on the floor of the house here earlier. we don't have a tax problem, we have a spending problem in this country. if we took everything from everybody, we still wouldn't have enough money to pay for all the promises
. that will happen between now and november 2014 that will shape the outcome. they will elect a new secretary- general. every right in the constitution , the country has been pushing for literally international regulation, like the internet. overhave been very patient the years. it sounds like black helicopter conspiracies, but it is not. i'm not optimistic. .he state department has a role we are all unified. congress is unified. we had a rare moment last year where the house and senate resolutions passed with both chambers and really underscoring our view of internet freedom. why is that view important to the developing world? most heartbreaking here. there are a lot of developing world nations that are signing onto this treaty that will undermine the economic future and the personal future. it might be because some regimes are more authoritarian. it right lock some of their freedom. that is what is motivating a lot of them. >> to block traffic, if i understand correctly. >> there is a lot going on. companies want to be able to charge websites for consumers accessing those websites. they als
with -- but the israeli government was not fully anded until saturday night into monday. they had their election just after the inauguration here in january. there was a lot of trouble forming a finalized coalition with the other parties there. obama is coming into a situation where there is not a huge amount that can really get done with a new government because they're still sorting themselves out and getting in a position. is much weakened from where he was before the election. he has fewer members of his own party and the parliament is in a situation where it is not entirely clear what the way forward is going to be. that is what obama is coming into, as he goes into these meetings. , with politico. thanks for your time this morning. guest: thank you. host: president obama and the prime minister will give you -- will be giving a joint press conference. look for coverage on c-span.org. minister ofrael defense from 2007 until this week wrote a piece in today's wall street journal. host: back to our discussion here for the 10th anniversary of the iraq war. we are getting your thoughts this morning.
incomparable in the house. the idea that it drove the adoption of doma -- >> it was an election year and a people do not have the political power to protect themselves. >> i want to ask whether, are there any intermediate positions between striking doma down entirely end up holding? i do not think so. >> you said that there are different cases. they are. statesstion is, do these have the authority to retain the traditional state of marriage? not that they have to. need a? it is the question on both. >> not asking you to yield their position. are there any interim positions in the case that the court could find between on the one hand doing what they suggested, to stay -- say the states have the full power to uphold or to change or do anything was same- sex marriages? and what the strongest view of the challengers is in prop. 8 our calls distinguishes unconstitutional. is a standing argument. >> it would be in a weird way. it would probably mean that there be marriage equality restored in california. >> why? quiet the judgments stays in effect. the that is clear at all. it is more tha
note here that the election of the prime minister for the coalition is a step forward. we look forward to working with him in the weeks ahead. we look forward to working with the congress as we seek to support the needs of the syrian people in their struggle to create a free, stable, and democratic syria. thank you. >> good morning chairman royce, ranking members, and members of this committee. this you for hosting hearing today. i am pleased to be able to appear before the committee with my colleagues. our offices work closely together to provide humanitarian aid to those affected by the violence in syria. the two-year anniversary coincides with another dark milestone. over one million refugees have fled syria. half of that number arrived in the last two months. i would like to share with you the approach taken to address the crisis and how it complements and reinforces what usaid does. refugeebe how the crisis is affecting the neighboring countries. i will not go into the details here. i invite questions from you on a very different set of situations we have seen in jordan, lebanon,
servants. it's about the oath we took as an elected official that we would serve our communities, that we would come here and make a difference. so congressman bera, for me, it's about standing strong and saying to my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, join us, join us and make a difference -- in making a difference to help our seniors and to protect and to save medicare. and that's my message and my story. nd i yield back. mr. bera: thank you to my colleague from the great state of ohio. that's why we're asking folks today to share their stories. we'd love to hear your story about how medicare has affected you or a family member or a friend. share it on facebook or twitter. we want to hear those stories. this body needs to hear those stories. this body needs to make sure when we're taking votes we're voting understanding those stories. you know, as a doctor, i took oath to do good, to do no harm. well, if medicare becomes a voucher program, it will do irrep ribble harm -- irrepairable harm to millions of americans. the reason i'm on the floor today is to talk about the good that medi
the money that have raised for re-election. was a second allegation that he threw a party to celebrate an anniversary of his in terms of his service and the house that corresponded to the date of his daughter's graduation. funds for use of personal reasons? andrews has reimbursed his campaign committee and made the typical statement that he is cooperating completely and he said this would exonerate him. look at this would say if i can take money out of that account but i'm not supposed to use, making restitution shows some ways -- some remorse but if you stole $30,000 from your company's pension fund, chances are, you would be in trouble. took a couple of trips many years.k to he was there back in the days of armarking where he earmarked money for a road in florida. these are pet project to help out companies and sometimes nonprofits and schools and infrastructure in their own districts. it was a little odd to see an alaska congressman helping a florida district. there was a developer there he had a relationship with a one of that road. representative of young, the charges don't revolv
't going to do well. it's elections. it's writing campaign ads because they can go back and say they voted this way on this, this and this. host: we're talking with ginger gibson, she's a congressional reporter with politico. she covered newt gingrich and mitt romney during the 2012 campaign. as worked with the star lenler covering governor chris christie and state politics and did some work with the news journal in delaware from may 2008 to november 2010. vered the gove more's office involving kristin o'donnell. go ahead. caller: i'm a recently retired government worker and looking at your title congress avoids government shutdown. for years government has run on continuing resolution which only allows the government to spend at the amount that it spent last year. the price of things are going up. if they can freeze the amount that the government can spend or the that the consumer can spend, why can they not control the amount that people are charged for? my question would be this also, congress controls the purse strings. all congressmen have staffs. if they got people that are supposed
definitely did not do much to support obama in this re- election cycle. however these three short days in the middle east have done a lot to bridge these gaps. we saw benjamin netanyahu willing to be persuaded by president obama. i think we saw the israeli public, even though it may have started out with a deep mistrust towards obama, it ended this week with a lot of affection. maybe it did manage to bridge some of these gaps. ,ost: after a two state evening he arrived on wednesday, meeting with the israeli prime minister. thursday he traveled to the west bank and met with the palestinian authority president. friday, meeting with the king of playing tourist yesterday and returning to washington at 8:00 last evening. the israeli prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, asked about the ambitions of iran when it comes to your -- nuclear weapons. here is more. [video clip] >> we had an opportunity to begin discussing a wide range of issues critical to our countries. foremost among these is the iranian fault -- relentless pursuit of nuclear weapons. mr. president, you have made it clear the you'
americans, citing this as a major reason why they lost last year's presidential election. as a result, they're now promising a kinder, gentler republican party. but sadly, the rhetoric just doesn't match the reality of a paul ryan budget which is nothing more than a rehash of the failed agenda that the american people have already rejected. the republican budget continues to push harsh and unnecessary budget cuts that eliminate the safety net for millions of middle class americans. the american people don't want a budget that break ours promises to seniors by turning medicare into a voucher program or cuts investments that support job creation just for the sake of more budget busting tax cuts for the wealthiest taxpayers and corporations. yet my friends on the other side my friends continue pushing this approach in the name of deficit reduction, but their own leadership admitted we don't have a debt crisis in the country. the architect, congressman paul ryan, said we don't have a debt crisis. speaker boehner said it's not an immediate problem. why should we enact this budget while democrats
. in the new york times it announces that the main exile coalition elected a nationalized syrian-born american citizen to be the first prime minister of an interim syrian government, charged with funneling aid to rebels inside syria, offering an alternative to the government of bashar al-assad, who's been a bad person. we want to see him go. man, andng this other information technology executive who lives in texas, and it goes on to say he is of kurdish dissent and may have seen a plus since he has been criticized for not reaching out to syria more. some council members say he was the choice of syria's muslim brotherhood, a group that had been banned and persecuted under the assad regime and that played a powerful role. then it goes on to say that mr. hito advocated for muslim americans as a representative of the council on american-islamic relations. concerningghtly particularly since i have all these different families of all different denominations and faiths telling me of their concerns of what takes place with some of the people currently in syria. for aadquarters, the need new fbi headqu
. show us the way to perfection. bless these elected members, their famlirks staffs, and they tuents in order that may continue to reach for the highest, noblest, greatest benefits for this nation. men. the speaker: the chair announces -- has examined the journal of the last day's proceedings and announces to the house his apufle thereof. the pledge of allegiance will be led by the gentleman from eorgia, mr. barro. mr. barrow: i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america: and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, pledge -- indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: without objection, the gentleman from missouri, mr. luetkemeyer, is recognized for one minute. mr. luetkemeyer: it is my privilege to introduce our guest chaplain to deliver the ening prayer, he's the reverend monsignor of the cathedral in missouri. he's served as the chaplain of the missouri house of representatives since 2011, he is involved in leading the house in prayer and helping to prove the fait
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